Blog: Science Communications

English, science and the editor as advocate

English, science and the editor as advocate

At a recent meeting of the BC branch of the Editors' Association of Canada, a panel discussed the role of editors in ensuring accessibility to information. One of the final questions asked was, “Are editors advocates?” I think that yes, we absolutely are. But here's another question: What are we advocates for? There are some general things we advocate for, clear communication being one, but I think that each of us has something specific that is important to us and that we should cultivate in our roles as editors.
READ MORE   |   22.12.2014   |   Science Communications
International Plain Language Day

International Plain Language Day

I'm fairly new to the concept of plain language, and throughout the afternoon I began to reflect on how it fits in with my role as a science communicator.
READ MORE   |   10.10.2014   |   Science Communications
Muses: David Ng

Muses: David Ng

Dr. David Ng is definitely our kind of person. In addition to being smart as a scientist, he's an excellent and inventive communicator with a great instinct for creating hooks. He's also very skilled at devising relatable premises that are truly capable of carrying a scientific discussion. I wrote a lot about this in my post on science writing, and Ng is a perfect example. If you plan to write about science for the public you need literary ingenuity in addition to scientific smarts.
READ MORE   |   26.07.2014   |   Science Communications
The UBiome Controversy

The UBiome Controversy

uBiome is a cool project serving a widely recognized need: the mapping of the human microbiome. We've posted about uBiome on Twitter and Facebook, and have generally been pretty jazzed about the enterprise. Our enthusiasm took a major hit, however, when Melissa Bates and other bloggers began to voice serious concerns about the ethical oversight of the project, or rather the apparent lack thereof.
READ MORE   |   14.03.2013   |   Science Communications