Blog: Science Stories

Death of the stethoscope 2

Death of the stethoscope 2

According to the headline(s), the humble “manual” stethoscope is on the edge of obsolescence in the medical world, facing a high-tech upgrade to or even replacement by hand-held devices that apparently do the job better.
READ MORE   |   07.06.2017   |   Science Stories
Reflecting self

Reflecting self

Selfies. Definitely notorious in the digital world. Who hasn't wrinkled up their nose in disgust at a friend's shameless self-promotion or puckered up a duck face for the camera?
READ MORE   |   07.03.2017   |   Science Stories
Death of the stethoscope?

Death of the stethoscope?

It's not just zombies that rise from the dead-science news stories can also come back to haunt the reader.
READ MORE   |   27.02.2017   |   Science Stories
Cool science gifts for the cool science kids

Cool science gifts for the cool science kids

With the arrival of a Talk Science to Me baby this summer, we're looking ahead this festive season to nurturing the next generation of science fans with some cool gifts. Crowdsourced from friends, like a lot of parenting advice these days, here's our list for keeping the kids (and adults too) fully occupied over the festive season.
READ MORE   |   05.12.2016   |   Science Stories
Rats! What do I buy for Christmas?

Rats! What do I buy for Christmas?

In addition to offering a stellar array of science communications services, Talk Science To Me would like to help with your gift list in the run-up to the festive season. Have you thought about gifting a rat or two this Christmas?
READ MORE   |   11.12.2014   |   Science Stories
Muses: Parasite of the Day

Muses: Parasite of the Day

If you've read other blog posts here or followed us on Twitter, you've likely noticed that we kind of like parasites. A lot. And whether or not you can muster up the same fascination, it's kind of hard to argue against their importance; roughly 40% of species on earth are parasitic, and as many as 75% of relationships in all foodwebs involve a parasitic interaction of some kind.
READ MORE   |   30.10.2014   |   Science Stories
Treasures: Natural nuclear reactors

Treasures: Natural nuclear reactors

I don't know how other people are taught, but for a long time I thought that nuclear reactors generated energy through some borderline-mystical atomic process that I could never really comprehend. That's partly true, but if you skip the details of how fission actually works, its role in a power plant is actually pretty simple to understand: the reason we can use nuclear decay to generate power is that it releases heat. So it's not really the mystical atoms as such that make nuclear power possible, but the comparatively mundane process of using heat to make steam to move turbines.
READ MORE   |   19.08.2014   |   Science Stories
Treasures: Stellar Nucleosynthesis

Treasures: Stellar Nucleosynthesis

Most of the things in our “Treasures” series are living organisms. I think this is partly because lots of living organisms are easy to identify with: they exist on a scale similar to ours and are easy to categorize as discrete entities. Phenomena are a little harder to sell, for the most part. Stellar nucleosynthesis has had some help though, in the form of Carl Sagan's wildly popular and surprisingly durable “star stuff” monologue. And it's true: we're literally made of atoms that came here from dying stars. Of course this is equally true of centipedes, norovirus and Rob Ford, so admittedly the magic relies on a bit of anthropocentrism.
READ MORE   |   01.08.2014   |   Science Stories